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Mybusiness

Written by: DANIEL LEWKOVITZ

How to keep your business safe over Christmas

With the holidays approaching and many businesses locking down for the summer break, here's what you should do to keep Christmas grinches from raiding your premises.

Despite the holiday ahead, worrisome thoughts about the safety of the business and employees can play on the mind. 'Can someone break in?', 'Will the electricity circuit black out?' and 'Will the team stay safe?' are some of the questions business owners tend to think about during this period.

Depending on the business, there are a number of things that can go wrong without anyone there to manage the problem. Here are my top five tips on how to keep your business safe over the Christmas holidays:

1. Identify risks unique to your business

When I speak to many business owners I hear: 'We've got nothing anyone would be interested in stealing'. This comes from a belief that criminals are only interested in cash and valuables.

However, risk goes beyond simple theft, and any incident that affects your business could have a far greater impact than the cost of the goods alone.

A butcher showed me his coolroom holding nearly $200,000 worth of meat and assumed nobody would steal half a cow. I pointed out that a fridge failure over the weekend could write off his entire stock (and a monitored alarm system can alert you to temperature changes).

The consequences of a loss far outweigh the modest cost of preventing it.

2. Protect workers wherever they roam

Most businesses address workplace health and safety but have a natural tendency to confine this to their office or headquarters, rather than any place workers could actually be.

Not only does the employer carry a legal responsibility for their safety, an injury to an employee (even while off duty) can have a serious impact on a business' operations.

As well as wishing everyone a happy and safe holiday, employers should take a few moments to talk to staff and remind them how to be careful in a season of drinking and partying.

3. Test your systems

Although Australian standards specify that security systems should be tested regularly (at least once a year for most commercial premises), very few people do it.

It's not uncommon for us to find a business owned by someone who was security-conscious and put in an alarm system that was ahead of its time 20 years ago, but now it hasn't been serviced for years.

4. Upgrade your security before, not after, you need it

Most people's natural behaviour is to ignore security until after they've suffered a loss.

We are constantly contacted by people who've just been robbed and want to discuss alarm installation and monitoring. This is too late!

It's much better to implement security proactively, before you suffer a loss in the first place. Don't leave it to the last minute.

We get so many people who ring every year just before Christmas, worried about security over the holidays. However, criminals work all year round. Security is just as important in February as it is in December.

5. Plan for a safe, secure 2017

Many businesses use the quiet January period to plan for the year ahead.

Start to include safety and security in these plans each year. Assess your overall risk (or seek assistance from someone who can help with this). Encourage staff to be part of this exercise. If they own it, they will implement it.

Security only works when it's everyone's responsibility – not just the owner's, manager's or security contractor's.

Quick things to consider:

  • Locks and keys: Is it time to consider auditable electronic access control?
  • Alarms and monitoring: Check the Australian Security Industry Association website to see whether your security company is a 'graded' monitoring centre. If not, move.
  • Window protection: Transparent window films can improve security without affecting aesthetics.
  • Internet protocol (IP) monitoring: Switch to IP monitoring of alarms instead of costly, insecure phone line-based monitoring.
  • Security policies and procedures: Are all staff aware of their responsibilities?
  • Patrols: Many businesses hire patrol companies to check on their premises. This is outdated and modern video patrols can achieve the same or better results, often at a significantly lower cost. Obviously, this requires a capable CCTV system.
  • Fire safety: Are your smoke detectors less than 10 years old? Are they monitored?
  • Insurance: Your business may have grown since you bought your policy. Check that it's up to date with your current list of assets and your operating environment.

Originally published by Mybusiness

Huffingtonpost

Written by: Emma Brancatisano

How To Keep Your House Safe This Summer (And All Year Round)

Throughout the year, it's a conversation that we tend to sideline.

Fast forward to the week before Christmas and things are a different story. You're prepping for the big day and your new year getaway and that question of security enters your mind.

Suddenly, your imminent departure is upon you.

"What we advise people to do is to think about security when things are quiet and they aren't in a mad rush."

"We find that come Christmas, lots of people who haven't done much about their security all year panic and realise that they have assets worth protecting," security expert and founder of monitoring centre Calamity Daniel Lewkovitz told The Huffington Post Australia.

"They have these assets all year round. And there's no evidence to suggest that criminals are more active over the Christmas period. What we advise people to do is to think about security when things are quiet and they aren't in a mad rush as it is increasingly becoming a fairly technical topic."

According to Lewkovitz, security requires multiple layers of defence.

"The security of any dwelling is only as strong as its weakest link. If you have the best alarm, the best CCTV cameras but you had a front door that wouldn't stand up to a well-aimed kick, you don't have security."

Here are some proactive ways to safeguard your home from top to bottom.

 
Encourage natural surveillance outdoors

According to Lewkovitz, our home aesthetic can often be unhelpful from a security standpoint. And whilst we tend to enjoy privacy, so too do thieves.

"Particularly around the front and on the sides of your house, you should actually try to avoid that," he said. "Make it such that for a person to get to an area, they will need to do so visibly. That way, they'll tend to migrate to an easier target."

Remove any bushes, shrubs or other obstacles near your entrance that could conceal any activity from passers-by.

And Lewkovitz encourages visible security.

"Thieves like to know that they have a good chance of obtaining the goods and leaving without being caught. When they see visible security, they will tend to move elsewhere."

 
Alarm and monitor: Is your monitoring system up to scratch?

Which brings us here.

According to Lewkovitz, an alarm system that simply rings a siren -- and is not otherwise monitored -- is worthless.

"If an alarm sits there making a lot of noise, nobody is coming."

"The proof is in the number of times people might have heard someone else's faulty, under maintained alarm system ringing and have not done anything about," Lewkovitz said.

"If an alarm sits there making a lot of noise, nobody is coming."

The best way to approach it is to have an IP monitored alarm system that ensures round-the-clock professional monitoring.

It's also important to know what you are getting -- and who is doing the monitoring. Lewkovitz recommends opting for member companies that are independently audited by the Australian Security Industry Association Limited (ASIAL).

"When you have a security problem and you go to make an insurance claim, one of the first things they are going to look at is whether they are an audited security provider. This is a crucial step."

 
How are you storing your valuables indoors?

When we think about protecting our valuable assets -- namely money and jewellery -- we cast our minds to the safe locked behind a flimsy cupboard in mum and dad's room.

And whilst Lewkovitz encourages a quality safe, he recommends moving past this.

"Have your safe in a discreet location that is not associated with the jewellery and the cash. It can also make sense to have a decoy safe in the bedroom," Lewkovitz said. "Be disciplined. There's no point in having a safe if you're not going to use it well. It comes back to security coming down to your weakest link."

Ensure that any valuable or expensive items are also concealed from windows or from direct view -- particularly when you're jetting off to the Bahamas.

 
How much are you sharing on social media?

This one's a biggie -- particularly when you're now lying poolside in said Bahamas.

"By sharing indiscriminately on social media, you're waving a huge flag to criminals and that's a huge downside," Lewkovitz said. "You need to veer on the side of caution."

This applies to not only sharing snaps of your getaway, but also belongings -- particularly those recently-endowed for Christmas.

"It's worth considering the benefits and implications of what you're posting online. Best case scenario, I would discourage people from sharing any sense of information about themselves, their family, their movements or whereabouts and their assets -- as well as any private confidential information that can also facilitate identity theft."

And worse case scenario? Ensure you have your privacy settings intact.

"Introduce enough interference so that what you are sharing becomes so general that it doesn't matter -- even if that is sharing photos of you having a great time, but not disclosing your whereabouts."

Beware of inadvertent location tagging.

 
Think about what you do with your presents

When we talk about concealing valuable items, this applies to new ones that come in fancy, festive wrapping.

"What I would suggest people do is stage your disposal of wrapping. Throw it away inside the bin, not next to the bin, over an extended period," Lewkovitz said.

"Come Boxing Day, recycle all of your glass bottles but hang onto everything else over the next few weeks rather than creating a huge magnet for criminals outside your house."

Originally published by Huffingtonpost

MyBusiness

Written by: SASHA KAREN

Security is key

Security is always important to protect your business - whether it's digital and bricks and mortar. But what's the most important thing to protect, and how do you do it? We asked one SME owner who operates a security firm for his advice. Speaking to My Business, Daniel Lewkovitz, CEO of Calamity Monitoring, says keeping up to date on security should be the highest priority for SME owners.

"Security and risk management is of the utmost importance to a business which wishes to stay in business," he says.

Mr Lewkovitz also suggests that SME owners should look at both physical and digital security in equal measures, rather than prioritising one over the other.

"The security of any system is only as strong as its weakest link," he says.

"You could have the best firewall and encrypted data systems known to man, but if a person can walk in off the street and physically remove your server, then you'd have no security.

"In the opposite direction, you could have armed guards standing outside a fortified building, but if hackers can come in over the wire and steal your information assets, you'd have no security either.

"It's important to address all of these angles, both online and in physical presences."

 
Blanket approaches don't work

Mr Lewkovitz says that businesses can't just put in an alarm here and a few cameras there, but need to take a methodical approach and carefully consider their full requirements.

"A small business [such as] a corner shop may not have significant information assets that are worth anything, but they may be at risk of armed holdup, whereas a major organisation that trades in information that is worth billions may not necessarily be at risk of a person walking in with a shotgun to steal cash, because they don't have any," he points out.

"Now, both of those organisations have significant risk issues that they need to address, but they're facing a very different range of threats.

"Every organisation - and indeed every different individual situation - is unique, and it's important that people look at their own organisation, look at what the assets are that they're trying to protect.

"The first step in this process really is just an analysis of '[What are we] trying to protect?' and 'Have we protected it?'. What happens next depends on the individual circumstances."

 
Stopping tomorrow's crimes

When considering security firms to partner with, Mr Lewkovitz suggests finding a firm that adapts with changes in technology, rather than one that just stays with the same kind of security.

"There's a never-ending arms race between criminals and law enforcement," he explains.

"Security and police are very good at stopping yesterday's crime; they're not always that good at stopping tomorrow's."

Mr Lewkovitz uses the rise of ransomware as an example: malicious software that can lock all the data on a computer, and promises to unlock it in exchange for a fee, typically in the hundreds of dollars.

"The question is whether it seems like there's more of that because we're hearing about it in the news, or if we're only hearing about it because it's more newsworthy by way of its uniqueness," he says.

"When you have traditional crime - armed robbery, homicide, theft, major fraud - those things are fairly accurately reported on by way of law enforcement, because people go to the police, they report a crime, those statistics are available."

However, when considering crime involving IT, Mr Lewkovitz says that it gets more difficult to find information, as there are business owners who aren't even aware of a breach in their systems, compared with the evidence of a robbery at a physical premise.

"That's the first thing: there's just ignorance - people don't even know about it."

In order to keep on top of security, Mr Lewkovitz advises business owners to conduct their own research into how similar businesses are impacted when affected with a new kind of attack, and ensure that their business won't be affected too.

"Organisations that ... look at their security management tend to be very good at stopping not only the existing range of criminal activity … but they're often well protected against tomorrow's crime as well," he says.

"The best way to approach security is on a proactive basis. Or, I suppose, to draw an analogy, putting out a fire might be seen as successful, but preventing that fire having been lit in the first stage is usually a lot more successful."

 
Do your research

Mr Lewkovitz says SMEs shouldn't put their faith in just any security firm.

He suggests business owners partner with a firm that can actually prove what it can do help their business.

"There's very low barriers to entry in the security industry," says Mr Lewkovitz.

"Anybody with a 1300 number and a P.O. box can call themselves a security company, but there is a difference between people who … can actually install and design effective surveillance systems, access control intrusion detection systems, versus any number of people who may be able to run a cable, or screw a few things to a wall, but perhaps don't have an overall consultative approach to security."

He also says SME owners should be inquisitive as to whether the security will actually help their businesses, "rather than just assuming an alarm is an alarm, or a camera is a camera".

By doing so, Mr Lewkovitz says SME owners can assess whether a security company takes the traditional route, or if they take a more custom-fit approach to their client's needs.

 
The most important assets to protect

According to Mr Lewkovitz, the most important assets a businessA businessman holds his hands around a paper crown of people, protecting them can protect are its employees and reputation.

"Typically, organisations look very closely at their buildings, they look closely at their cash," he notes.

"All of these things, typically, are replaceable and insurable."

Just as buildings and income are considered assets, your business' employees are just as valuable, according to Mr Lewkovitz.

"I think that's actually an area that organisations need to look very closely at," he says.

"If you have a staff member who then ends up with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), or has to take extended time off, and starts having nightmares, those are things that are extremely, extremely costly to an organisation in terms of staff wellbeing."

While Australia is a safe place in which to live and work, Mr Lewkovitz says it's important not to believe it's always safe.

"If we were South Africa or Colombia, you'd completely take for granted that staff can be assaulted and robbed," he says.

"The reality is Australia is a safe place, but that's not to say it's nirvana and nothing happens. That is also an important risk."

As such, he concludes, "Don't just look at the building and don't just look at the firewall, but actually look at the people."

Originally published by MyBusiness

IT Brief

Written by: SARA BARKER

Calamity Monitoring says disruption key to innovative security

Calamity Monitoring believes that it's on the forefront of new security technologies because of its independence as a security monitoring company.

Founder Daniel Lewkowitz formed the company in 2008 and has since helped create life-safety monitoring systems, and safety devices for seniors. However, the company also recognises the important of enterprise and business IT security.

Lewkowitz says the company's solutions focus on high-tech risk management using innovative technology. Smartphone solutions addressed the portability and ease-of-use that security needs, including Fearless, an app that can contact 24/7 live operators when triggered. The app reports live audio, video and location and can help report emergencies.

Bigger and more traditional security companies are often slower to adapt to changes in the security landscape, which is why Calamity has been able to provide innovative solutions, Lewkowitz believes.

Lewkowitz's skill and experience comes from a background of security projects with the police, federal and state governments. He believes these projects have allowed him to take an inside look into security issues ad bring his experience to Calamity.

"Security is easily one of the most important considerations for any home or business, yet it can be largely overlooked until after a loss - when it's too late. Calamity's aim is to make smarter safety solutions accessible, practical and easy to implement in every situation imaginable. Smarter technology has quite literally been a lifesaver for individuals but as local lifestyles and global threats change, technology needs to be able to keep up to changes in how criminals operate," Lewkowitz says.

Calamity is Australia's premier CSAA Five Diamond certified central station, and has also been awarded an A1 grading for ASIAL for the Centre for Advanced Security Technology and Leadership Excellence (CASTLE).

Originally published by IT Brief

Inside Small Business

Written by: Inside Small Business

Innovation key to security management

A security management expert says: "As local lifestyles and global threats change, technology needs to be able to keep up to changes in how criminals operate."

With global threats on the rise and modern technology forever changing, security management systems need to adapt. After recognising a need for a disruptive player in the otherwise stagnant security industry, Mr Daniel Lewkovitz formed Calamity Monitoring in 2008.

Daniel has been working in the security industry for more than 20 years and has been involved in low, medium and high security operations, from single-bedroom units to embassies, state and federal law enforcement projects, banks, anti-terrorism, extreme high net-worth families, education and childcare facilities as well as businesses and homes of all sizes.

Working across such diverse security operations, Lewkovitz identified a need for a more modern security company that embraced high-tech solutions and could respond to emerging security threats.

Calamity focuses on high-tech risk management. It recognised the convergence of physical security and information/IT security management - from firewalls to concrete walls. Large security companies can be slower to adapt to changes in the security landscape. As an independent security monitoring company, Calamity has been able to drive new technologies in response to contemporary threats.

For example, life-safety monitoring systems, including Fearless, a fully monitored mobile app for lone workers, mobile staff, journalists, domestic violence victims and anyone looking for security on-the-go as well as Silent Sentinel, a high-tech safety device for seniors.

Innovative technology is at the heart of Calamity. Daniel recognised using smartphones as a safety tool is the most effective way to protect people wherever they are. Fearless is based on an app for Apple iOS, Android and Windows Mobile users, and can even be activated through a smart watch. When triggered, Calamity's 24/7 live operators receive customers' location, audio and video. As people are more likely to carry a fully charged mobile phone with them than any other tool or gadget, Fearless empowers a device that is readily accessible when needed.

Daniel used experience gained from large-scale security projects, such as the police, federal and state government as well as corporate engagements, to implement the most effective security concepts at Calamity.

"Security is easily one of the most important considerations for any home or business, yet it can be largely overlooked until after a loss - when it's too late. Our aim is to make smarter safety solutions accessible, practical and easy to implement in every situation imaginable," says Lewkovitz.

"Smarter technology has quite literally been a lifesaver for individuals but as local lifestyles and global threats change, technology needs to be able to keep up to changes in how criminals operate," he adds.

Calamity has received an A1 Grading from ASIAL for the Centre for Advanced Security Technology and Leadership Excellence (CASTLE) in Sydney. It is also Australia's first-ever CSAA Five Diamond certified central station. Having started with a single customer, the company (www.calamity.com.au) has grown in only a few years to guard thousands of customers and billions of dollars in assets nationally.

Originally published by Inside Small Business

Security Brief

Written by: SARA BARKER

Calamity Monitoring says disruption key to innovative security

Calamity Monitoring believes that it's on the forefront of new security technologies because of its independence as a security monitoring company.

Founder Daniel Lewkowitz formed the company in 2008 and has since helped create life-safety monitoring systems, and safety devices for seniors. However, the company also recognises the important of enterprise and business IT security.

Lewkowitz says the company's solutions focus on high-tech risk management using innovative technology. Smartphone solutions addressed the portability and ease-of-use that security needs, including Fearless, an app that can contact 24/7 live operators when triggered. The app reports live audio, video and location and can help report emergencies.

Bigger and more traditional security companies are often slower to adapt to changes in the security landscape, which is why Calamity has been able to provide innovative solutions, Lewkowitz believes.

Lewkowitz's skill and experience comes from a background of security projects with the police, federal and state governments. He believes these projects have allowed him to take an inside look into security issues ad bring his experience to Calamity.

"Security is easily one of the most important considerations for any home or business, yet it can be largely overlooked until after a loss - when it's too late. Calamity's aim is to make smarter safety solutions accessible, practical and easy to implement in every situation imaginable. Smarter technology has quite literally been a lifesaver for individuals but as local lifestyles and global threats change, technology needs to be able to keep up to changes in how criminals operate," Lewkowitz says.

Calamity is Australia's premier CSAA Five Diamond certified central station, and has also been awarded an A1 grading for ASIAL for the Centre for Advanced Security Technology and Leadership Excellence (CASTLE).

Originally published by Security Brief

News Local

Written by: Janita Singh, NewsLocal

Security expert Daniel Lewkovitz of Calamity Monitoring says modern safety depends on technology

You might think security is typically someone standing in the doorway of a pub.

But new technologies have given birth to huge diversity in the security field. One person who has the insider information is Daniel Lewkovitz, CEO of Calamity Monitoring, a company which installs and monitors electronic security and life-safety systems.

Lewkovitz says technology advances allows people to be protected not just in their homes or office but even when they are alone on the street.

Lewkovitz says new-age security staff are trained personnel who use internet and IP (internet Protocol) based security networks allowing security monitoring operators (as pictured above) to conduct remote viewing of cameras, and react accordingly.

Another aspect is the development of personal ­security systems, he says.

"As well as the traditional role of 'asset protection', new personal security systems can keep students safe on campus, seniors out of aged care for longer and lone workers just as safe on their own,'' he says.

"If a person is in danger they can dispatch the appropriate responders.

Businesses and homeowners can also keep an eye on their property from their mobile and even remotely open doors/gates.''

The diversity of security work today signals a shift from the stereotype of a "large build" male security officer looking for a second job.

"The heads of security risk-management for some of the country's most famous landmarks and large organisations are also now women," Lewkovitz says.

"At Calamity, we employ people with disabilities (the team includes quadriplegic and blind workers) ... and simply look for smart ­people who will care about customer safety."

Lewkovitz says it's a great time to pursue a ­career in this field.

"Due to outdated perceptions, the security industry is lacking talent in some areas and as the market grows there are huge opportunities for people considering a career change."

The modern security guard

  • Lewkovitz says new-age security staff need basic computer skills, great communication skills and the ability to act fast but calmly in a crisis.
  • Other requirements include licensing eligibility (varies by state).
  • Depending on the role educational requirements can vary from high-school and Certificate II courses to engineering and risk-management tertiary degrees.
  • Companies provide training in-house. Make sure the company you are applying to is licensed.

Originally published by News Local

The Today Show

Staying safe on the streets

TODAY take a look at the new personal surveillance product called 'Fearless', which is designed to keep you safe.

Originally published by The Today Show

What's New in Electronics

Written by: By Daniel Lewkovitz

Future tracking technology - what are the cybersecurity risks?

Five new applications of tracking technology are predicted along with details on the expected security implications for users.

Thanks to technological developments, carrying a map or asking a stranger for directions is now a distant memory. Most smartphones use GPS and Wi-Fi technology to determine location with an accuracy of a few metres. New tracking technologies are set to be released in the next 10 years that could revolutionise our everyday lives. Daniel Lewkovitz, technology and security expert and founder of Calamity, shares his predictions for the biggest developments in tracking technology and whether they pose any cybersecurity risks.

1. Eye-tracking smartphones

The next generation of smartphones could include built-in eye-tracking technology so notifications will only be displayed when the user is looking at the screen. It will also make autocorrect 'more intuitive' as it will automatically autocorrect a word depending on whether or not the user was focused on what they were typing.

Potential security implications: Eye-tracking enabled smartphones will offer an additional biometric safety measure. Smartphones that already use fingerprint passwords and retinal or iris-based authentication will automatically assist to keep data secure from criminals or recognise who is using a device - for example, a parent or their child - and configure it accordingly.

2. Smart shopping centres

Shopping centres are already embracing technology to draw customers back to bricks-and-mortar stores. Facial recognition technology can help to identify particular customers such as regulars or those banned for shoplifting. Tracking the way people move through stores will enhance the experience, making it more personal while increasing revenue for stores.

Potential security implications: There is the possibility for inadvertent privacy breaches. An American chain store used data analytics to identify possibly pregnant women from changes to their shopping habits. It caused a scandal when they sent coupons for baby products to a high-school student, causing her father to lash out at the store. However, the analysis was correct.

3. Personal safety

Tracking technology has the potential to make individuals safer than ever before. Devices and mobile apps have been designed to protect lone workers, the elderly, the disabled or anyone who might feel unsafe or at risk. Calamity has products called the Silent Sentinel pendant and the Fearless mobile security system. Silent Sentinel is aimed at seniors, lone workers and those at risk in their home. The pendant has automatic fall detection built in. The Fearless personal safety system extends this protection to the streets and includes a mobile app, supported by 24/7 live monitoring.

Potential security implications: These devices are designed to increase safety and support risk management. Given the obvious safety benefits of these systems there is the possibility of users feeling 'bulletproof' and exposing themselves to unnecessary additional risk.

4. Health and fitness

Fitness bands and smartwatches are expected to grow in popularity and become even 'smarter'. Sensors may begin to be attached directly to the skin on temporary 'patches' or even swallowed, eventually being embedded inside the body.

Potential security implications: It is possible that wearable devices could be compromised, revealing personal information including the user's location. A hack on 'smart' pacemaker devices could theoretically allow a person to induce a heart attack in someone with one fitted.

5. Virtual reality (VR)

Will we soon be able to move inanimate objects just by using our eyes? VR uses motion tracking and eye tracking to create the most immersive experiences.

Potential security implications: The virtual environment is very new and therefore at risk of as-yet-unidentified security threats. Privacy policies and encryption processes are still in the early stages of use and may not yet reflect the needs of users.

Originally published by What's New in Electronics

Safety Solutions

Written by: Safety Solutions Staff

Future tracking technology - what are the cybersecurity risks?

Five new applications of tracking technology are predicted along with details on the expected security implications for users.

Thanks to technological developments, carrying a map or asking a stranger for directions is now a distant memory. Most smartphones use GPS and Wi-Fi technology to determine location with an accuracy of a few metres. New tracking technologies are set to be released in the next 10 years that could revolutionise our everyday lives. Daniel Lewkovitz, technology and security expert and founder of Calamity, shares his predictions for the biggest developments in tracking technology and whether they pose any cybersecurity risks.

1. Eye-tracking smartphones

The next generation of smartphones could include built-in eye-tracking technology so notifications will only be displayed when the user is looking at the screen. It will also make autocorrect 'more intuitive' as it will automatically autocorrect a word depending on whether or not the user was focused on what they were typing.

Potential security implications: Eye-tracking enabled smartphones will offer an additional biometric safety measure. Smartphones that already use fingerprint passwords and retinal or iris-based authentication will automatically assist to keep data secure from criminals or recognise who is using a device - for example, a parent or their child - and configure it accordingly.

2. Smart shopping centres

Shopping centres are already embracing technology to draw customers back to bricks-and-mortar stores. Facial recognition technology can help to identify particular customers such as regulars or those banned for shoplifting. Tracking the way people move through stores will enhance the experience, making it more personal while increasing revenue for stores.

Potential security implications: There is the possibility for inadvertent privacy breaches. An American chain store used data analytics to identify possibly pregnant women from changes to their shopping habits. It caused a scandal when they sent coupons for baby products to a high-school student, causing her father to lash out at the store. However, the analysis was correct.

3. Personal safety

Tracking technology has the potential to make individuals safer than ever before. Devices and mobile apps have been designed to protect lone workers, the elderly, the disabled or anyone who might feel unsafe or at risk. Calamity has products called the Silent Sentinel pendant and the Fearless mobile security system. Silent Sentinel is aimed at seniors, lone workers and those at risk in their home. The pendant has automatic fall detection built in. The Fearless personal safety system extends this protection to the streets and includes a mobile app, supported by 24/7 live monitoring.

Potential security implications: These devices are designed to increase safety and support risk management. Given the obvious safety benefits of these systems there is the possibility of users feeling 'bulletproof' and exposing themselves to unnecessary additional risk.

4. Health and fitness

Fitness bands and smartwatches are expected to grow in popularity and become even 'smarter'. Sensors may begin to be attached directly to the skin on temporary 'patches' or even swallowed, eventually being embedded inside the body.

Potential security implications: It is possible that wearable devices could be compromised, revealing personal information including the user's location. A hack on 'smart' pacemaker devices could theoretically allow a person to induce a heart attack in someone with one fitted.

5. Virtual reality (VR)

Will we soon be able to move inanimate objects just by using our eyes? VR uses motion tracking and eye tracking to create the most immersive experiences.

Potential security implications: The virtual environment is very new and therefore at risk of as-yet-unidentified security threats. Privacy policies and encryption processes are still in the early stages of use and may not yet reflect the needs of users.

Originally published by Safety Solutions

ARN

Written by: Hafizah Osman (ARN)

What lies for the future of tracking technology?

New tracking technologies are set to be released in the next ten years that will revolutionise our everyday lives, according to technology and security expert and founder of Calamity, Daniel Lewkovitz. Lewkovitz shared his predictions for the biggest developments in tracking technology and if they pose any cyber security risks.

Lewkovitz said the next generation of smartphones could include built-in eye tracking technology so notifications will only be displayed when the user is looking at the screen. It will also make autocorrect more intuitive, automatically autocorrecting a word depending on whether or not the user was focused on what they were typing.

"Eye-tracking enabled smartphones will offer an additional biometric safety measure. Smart phones already use fingerprint passwords and retinal or iris based authentication will automatically assist to keep data secure from criminals or recognise who is using a device and configure it accordingly," he said.

He mentioned that tracking technology will enable smart shopping centres, as they are already embracing technology to draw customers back to bricks-and- mortar stores.

With facial recognition technology, they will be able to identify particular customers such as regulars or those banned for shoplifting. Tracking the way people move through stores will enhance the experience, making it more personal while increasing revenue for stores.

However, he said there is the possibility for inadvertent privacy breaches.

"An American chain store used data-analytics to identify possibly pregnant women from changes to their shopping habits. It caused a scandal when they sent coupons for baby products to a high-school student, causing her father to lash out at the store. However, the analysis was correct."

Tracking technology also has the potential to make individuals safer than ever before, according to Lewkovitz.

Devices and mobile apps have been designed to protect lone workers, the elderly, disabled, or anyone who might feel unsafe or at-risk.

"These devices are designed to increase safety and support risk-management. Given the obvious safety benefits of these systems there is the possibility of users feeling 'bulletproof' and exposing themselves to unnecessary additional risk," he said.

In addition, fitness bands and smart watches are expected to grow in popularity and become even smarter. Sensors may begin to be attached directly to the skin on temporary patches or even swallowed, eventually being embedded inside the body.

"But it is possible that wearable devices could be compromised, revealing personal information including the users location. A hack on smart pacemaker devices could theoretically allow a person to induce a heart attack in someone with one fitted."

The last prediction he mentioned is advancements in VR.

"Will we soon be able to move inanimate objects just by using our eyes? VR uses motion-tracking and eye-tracking to create the most immersive experiences.

"The virtual environment is very new and therefore at risk of as yet unidentified security threats. Privacy policies and encryption processes are still in the early stages of use and may not reflect the needs of users," he added.

Originally published by ARN

IoTHUB

Written by: Peter Gutierrez

The future of tracking technology

Daniel Lewkovitz believes that tomorrow's tracking technologies offer both big opportunities and significant risks.

The CEO of Australian IT and physical security company Calamity Monitoring spoke with IoT Hub about the future of technologies such as eye-tracking, facial recognition, and health, safety and security systems.

He identified eye-tracking technology in smartphones as becoming more prevalent, potentially being used to display notifications only when the user looks at the screen, or to make autocorrect more intuitive by determining if the user is focused on what they're typing.

"There are already products that track eye movements, where they put a heat map over the top of a website and they allow companies to see where the user's eyes are actually going," Lewkovitz said.

He said that while the majority of such systems require the consent of the user before tracking is performed, it wouldn't be difficult to obtain approval to perform such tracking by burying it in an End User License Agreement, which users tend to accept without reading.

"It's certainly possible that front-facing cameras that are now ubiquitous could be doing that."

Facial recognition in retail

He also identified smart shopping centres and their ability to perform facial recognition to identify regular visitors or prior shoplifting offenders as a growth area for the use of tracking technology.

"One of the things that has happened over the last ten years is that cameras, which were just a passive, analogue device are now essentially little computers with lenses attached to them, and can perform all sorts of clever analytics," he said.

Lewkovitz said he has seen a shift in priorities among retailers, with Calamity Monitoring selling cameras to retailers mainly as data gatherers for customer movement analytics, and security now a secondary consideration.

"The next layer up from this functionality is using active facial recognition to determine if someone is friend or foe."

He said that using cameras for active identification of shoplifters is easy to justify, but using them to identify regular customers introduces a perception of a breach of privacy.

"This technology would give retailers a level of information about their customers upon arrival as opposed to at the point of sale, but I think many of them are still trying to find valid use cases to implement these systems," he said.

Personal safety and security

Lewkovitz said that tracking technology has the potential to make individuals safer than ever before, and it's an area that Calamity Monitoring has invested in.

The company offers the Silent Sentinel pendant that has built-in fall detection for senior citizens, and the Fearless mobile security system which provides 24/7 live monitoring of a user's whereabouts via a mobile app.

However, he worries that users that possess these sorts of systems may start to take unnecessary risks because they feel "bulletproof" by using such technology.

"The best way for people to approach risk with their personal safety is to be aware of it, and if they're thinking about these things, it allows them to make a calculated assessment on what they consider as acceptable risk and act accordingly, rather than relying on an app to 'keep you safe'," he said.

Health and fitness tech

Lewkovitz also sees fitness bands and smartwatches that monitor personal well-being will grow in popularity and become even smarter, and evolve into devices that are attached directly to the skin or swallowed.

He sees the use of these and other digital health technologies as proactive measures to reduce the burden on the health system in Australia. He said it's more cost-effective to use these technologies to reduce the reliance on health care services than to continually increase investment in facilities that are already at breaking point.

"Wearable and on-person health technologies can save lives, improve the quality of life, and substantially reduce the national cost of health," he said.

"However, it will take government leadership that is smart enough to recognise the proactive use of technology can result in a far more efficient system overall than the present situation which largely revolves around cleaning up a mess after it's already happened."

Originally published by IoTHUB

Net Guide

Written by: SARA BARKER

Smart tracking tech: prepare for the next 10 years of evolution

Tracking technology is growing ever stronger with GPS accuracy able to be pinpointed to within a few metres, rendering maps obsolete.

Those developments will only get more powerful in the next decade, according to Daniel Lewkovitz,Technology and security expert and founder of Calamity, an Australian company that offers electronic security monitoring.

Lewkovitz predicts five major trends and their potential effects on security.

Smartphones will use eye trackers

Your smartphone already offers eye tracking to an extent, but Lewkovitz believes that this will be accelerated much further. He believes that the technology will allow users to see notifications only when they are looking at the screen.

He also believes that eye tracking tech will be able to detect whether a user is paying attention when they type, allowing autocorrect to become even more 'intuitive' with its correction methods.

Security issues: Lewkovitz believes that eye tracking tech will work in harmony with existing retinal and fingerprint scanning biometrics, which can be configured to recognised different device users, such as people who share a phone.

Smart malls will be watching

Despite the trend towards online shopping, Lewkovitz says tracking technology is being used in stores, malls and shopping centres to entice customers and use data analytics to understand shoppers.

Facial recognition technology will be able to aid in the identification of shoplifters, regular shoppers and the way they move through stores. This data, according to Lewkovitz, "will enhance the experience, making it more personal while increasing revenue for stores."

Security issues: Lewkovitz says privacy is a major issue. He gives the example of a store in the United States that used shopping habit changes to target women who may have become pregnant.

The store sent baby product coupons to a high school student. Her father criticised the store, although the analytics were right.

Smart devices for personal safety

Lewkovitz says devices and specific apps can protect the most vulnerable in society, as well as those who feel unsafe in certain situations. Calamity has already developed an app that incorporates 24/7 live monitoring, automatic fall detection and a mobile app for the elderly, solo workers and those in home environments who are at risk.

Security issues: While these devices are built to keep people safe, Lewkovitz says they could encourage more risky behaviour as people may start to believe they are 'bulletproof'.

Smart wearables for fitness and health

The increasing prevalence of smart watches, fitness bands and health monitoring devices will enable the tech behind them to evolve and become even smarter, Lewkovitz says. He predicts that skin sensors will be applied via temporary patches or swallowed for permanent attachment inside the body.

Security issues: Lewkovitz says devices run the risk of being hacked, which may leak users' sensitive data, personal information and even their location. He points out that if pacemakers adapt smart technology, they could also be hacked in a way that could be used to cause a heart attack in patients.

The virtual reality wave

Lewkovitz believe that telekinesis via virtual reality will become much more immersive, through the use of motion and eye tracking technology.

Security issues: Privacy policy and company guidelines are still being explored and may not properly protect users, because virtual reality technology is so new. Lewkovitz says there are still unknown security threats still to be identified as virtual reality develops.

Originally published by Net Guide

Style Magazines

Written by: CANDICE JACKSON

Use protection, guys. Virtual protection.

The internet can be a wonderful place. It has online shopping, streaming services, social sites to catch up with (or stalk) old friends and flames, memes and videos of cats that make you lol.

However, the internet can also be a scary and unkind place if you don't know how to protect yourself while using it. We do a lot online these days and malicious or opportunistic internet users can take advantage of all your online activity, from logging into emails or bank accounts and purchasing goods or services to sending private information or pictures to others.

What's even worse is that cyber attacks are criminal acts that can often go unnoticed. Common indicators include unknown charges to credit cards, emails or phone calls from friends indicating they received a suspicious message from you or peculiar behaviour by your computers.

Security evangelist and founder of Calamity Monitoring Daniel Lewkovitz says unlike what we see in movies or TV shows, attacks can be perpetrated by anyone. Cyber attacks come from young children and unskilled operators (known as "script kiddies" who have simply downloaded "off the shelf" attack software) right up to state-level agencies who engage in cyber-warfare and attempt to cause harm to a nation's defence or strategic interests.

Here are five easy steps to stay protected:

Be more aware

No, that Nigerian prince doesn't really want to give you $250,000 in exchange for a short-term loan or your bank account details. Be aware, be suspicious and be careful not to fall for initial traps that can give hackers or cyber attackers access to your information. It's not always in the form of a dodgy email either; other "phishing" scams can include pop-ups and instant messaging or unsecure smart phone apps.

Have complicated passwords

Avoid the temptation to use a generic password with 123 or your favourite number after it, as criminals can crack these passwords with ease. There are many guides that make a strong password, such as using a mixture of capital letters, numbers and punctuation marks. But who's going to remember a password like M34#!DzL7$? (No one.) And writing it down can lead to even more security problems.

Security expert Lewkovitz says there is now research to suggest a long, memorable phrase such as "I went to the park the other day" is actually a cryptographically secure password which would be difficult for computers to randomly guess. But keep in mind using the same password for everything is also a major no-no!

Back up your information

This is not only because systems can fail under ordinary use but also because it allows you to "roll back" to before an attack compromised your information. Yep, computers can travel back in time and continue working as though the virus never attacked.

Keep your software updated

Stop clicking "remind me later" when your computer prompts you to update your operating system. We all do it but IT MUST STOP. Also, consider installing legitimate anti-virus or anti-malware software to prevent attacks or intrusions.

Don't forget physical security

There's no point having the most encrypted computer in the world if someone can literally walk in and steal it. It's generally accepted that once a person has physical access to computer hardware, it's game over. Protect your home and business with basic security (doors and locks) as well as electronic security such as a monitored alarm system and cameras. Thankfully, these kinds of things have come down significantly in price over the last few years.

What happens if you're under attack?

Mr Lewkovitz says once your identity has been compromised it can sometimes be difficult to get large corporations to talk to you. Mostly because they may not think you are who you say you are. Police CAN help, but many front-line police officers may not be aware of high-tech crime resources available to them. Remember to notify your bank immediately; they can freeze accounts and investigate fraudulent charges if made aware.

Originally published by Style Magazines

Aussie Mum Network

Written by: Johanna Morley

Keeping your home & family secure

I recently spoke with Daniel Lewkovitz founder of Calamity Monitoring a security monitoring service about the biggest security risks to Australian homes and what we can do to minimise them.

What are the biggest risks Australian's need to be aware of around their homes?

There are numerous threats to homes, from fire to burglary to accident and focusing on any one threat to the exclusion of others is leaving yourself open to attack. Nearly all incidents, accidental or criminal affect assets and people. Anything which may hurt your belongings (assets) or family (people) therefore needs to be addressed.

How can we make our homes and families safer?

Most tools for securing homes seem obvious after they are explained however it is surprising how many people think about décor and furnishings but do not consider more mundane matters such as a first aid kit or an alarm system.

A true security professional who might focus on one area, such as locks or electronic security may also be able to identify other hazards and draw these to your attention so they may be fixed.

Are there any security products we can use to improve home safety?

Australians generally do not keep guns in the home and criminals know this. As such, breaking in during the night - 'home invasions' are typically low risk to them. At best, you will sleep right through them. At worst if you confront them you are no significant threat. Beyond the initial loss of your belongings, the feeling of having your private space violated can affect your peace of mind (and sleep) for many years.

A well designed alarm system is a simple step to make your home appear a 'hard target' which is likely to make criminals choose elsewhere. It is important that alarm systems are monitored by a certified 'graded' monitoring centre as otherwise they are little more than noise-makers.

What are the trends developing in the security space?

1) With the surge in low-cost electronics a lot of companies are now offering to install home security systems. In many cases the person, such as an electrician or IT provider are not actually licenced to do so. Whilst they may know how to pull a cable through a wall, even if the system works, when it comes time to file an insurance claim you may find it rejected on the basis that the system was not installed according to Australian Standards.

Many smaller security businesses claim to provide monitoring but do not in fact do this in-house. Rather, they outsource it on a wholesale basis and charge you an inflated margin for a third-party to provide monitoring. The end-result is usually a cheaper, lesser product. You will usually only find out it doesn't work, the one time you needed it to.Whilst there are tens of thousands of security companies, very few actually own a monitoring centre.

The Australian Security Industry Association Limited (ASIAL - asial.com.au) publish a list of 'graded' monitoring centres who have been independently audited and approved by police and insurers. The A1 Grading is the highest level. Consumers should avoid any company who is not listed.

2) Calamity (calamity.com.au) uses 'IP monitoring' to allow alarm systems to be monitored without phonelines. This can save you money on line rental (you no longer require a fixed phone service)

Even better, as well as providing protection, these modern security systems can feature lifestyle benefits for example allowing you to open the gate, garage or front door from anywhere using a smartphone 'app'. This is great for when you receive a delivery at home but are away.

Calamity owns Australia's most modern and highest rated security monitoring centre and is the first to effectively combine IT and physical security. Calamity offers end-to-end security services for homes, businesses and individuals.

To find out more about Daniel and Calamity visit www.calamity.com.au

Originally published by Aussie Mum Network

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SafeToWork

Written by: Sharon Masige

Worker safety a priority during Safe Work month

October is Safe Work Month, raising awareness of the importance of safety in the workplace.

Workplace health and safety is of critical importance for all employees and employers.

Last year, 190 people died while on the job, and during 2013-14, more than 106,000 serious workers' compensation claims were lodged.

Security monitoring provider Calamity has launched the Fearless app in the lead up to Safe Work month, a personal safety system to protect staff, particularly 'lone workers' such as mobile staff, construction workers, and salespeople. It is designed to assist in emergency situations and dispatch help as quickly and efficiently as possible.

In a dangerous situation, or when staff fail to 'check-in', the app can raise an alarm. Calamity's 24/7 monitoring centre is alerted and has access to the user's location, allowing live operators to initiate a suitable response. The alarm can either be activated manually or automatically when a countdown timer reaches zero.

The system is cloud-based so even if the phone is destroyed or stolen the user can be protected.

Professions that require employees to regularly travel offsite, or who work irregular hours, can face added occupational risks. Following a survey of health professionals, teachers and police working in rural and remote Australia, 57 per cent of respondents indicated that they had experienced verbal abuse from community members in the past 12 months, while 21 per cent experienced physical violence. Therefore, the app can provide reassurance for workers entering potentially dangerous situations.

Journey mode can also be activated on the app while travelling, which provides live updates to emergency contacts or employers if required. Meeting mode can be set for a potentially risky meeting or while alone; with an alert raised if a countdown timer reaches zero without being reset by the user. In situations where injury is a possibility, such as off-site construction, the Man-Down function offers additional protection by flagging any sudden deceleration, non-movement or impact.

Originally published by SafeToWork

Food&Beverage

Safe and fearless for Safe Work Month

Every October, Safe Work Australia Month is held to raise awareness of the importance of workplace safety. In 2013-14 there were 106,565 serious workers' compensation claims made and tragically, 190 workers lost their lives while working in Australia in 2015 . Workplace health and safety is of vital importance for all employees and employers, yet some professions face additional risks that can be difficult to prepare for. Fearlessâ„¢ is a personal safety system that helps keep workers safe wherever they are. It is of particular benefit to 'lone workers' such as mobile staff, nurses, construction and salespeople.

Developed by Calamity, Australia's highest-rated security monitoring provider, Fearless offers mobile protection to staff and helps businesses quickly comply with some of the toughest WHS requirements. Fearless is accessed through an app on a piece of technology everybody already carries - their smart phones. In a dangerous situation, or when staff fail to 'check-in' as expected an alarm can be raised through the app. Calamity's 24/7 monitoring centre is alerted and has access to the user's location as well as using the phone for audio and camera evidence, allowing live operators to initiate a suitable response. The alarm can either be activated manually or automatically when a countdown timer reaches zero. The system is cloud-based so even if the phone is destroyed or stolen the user can be protected.

Professions that require employees to travel offsite regularly, or who work irregular hours can face added occupational risks that can be difficult for management to prepare for. A survey of health professionals, teachers and police working in rural and remote Australia found that 57% had experienced verbal abuse from community members in the past 12 months and 21% had experienced physical violence . In situations that can compromise a person's feeling of safety, such as finishing a nursing shift late at night or needing to visit a stranger's house for an appointment, Fearless can offer much needed peace of mind.

While travelling, Journey mode can be activated on the app, providing live updates to emergency contacts or employers if necessary. Meeting mode can be set for a potentially risky meeting or while alone. An alert is raised if a countdown timer reaches zero without being reset by the user. In situations where injury or personal immobilisation is a possibility, such as off-site construction, Man-Down is a function which offers additional protection by flagging any sudden deceleration, non-movement or impact.

Fearless has been purposefully built to assist in emergency situations and to dispatch help as quickly and efficiently as possible if needed. Businesses owners and managers feel at ease knowing that their staff are prepared for the worst case scenario or simple day to day risk. "Fearless has far-reaching applications in so many workplace scenarios," says Daniel Lewkovitz, CEO of Calamity and designer of Fearless. "It has been carefully constructed to ensure employers can comply with Work Health and Safety requirements and offers peace of mind to anyone who may feel unsafe in their personal or professional life. Fearless takes a proactive approach to safety, as users can switch it on before any potentially dangerous situation, such as travelling to a meeting, and it will let others know you arrived safely without anyone needing to remember to 'text their boss'. The technology is the best on the market and this tool saves lives."

Technology is the most effective way to ensure staff feel safe and is essential for collecting evidence of sound, image and location if needed. As jobs have become increasingly flexible and more people work irregular hours and at different locations, Fearless is the most efficient tool to protect staff.

Originally published by Food&Beverage

Inside Small Business

Worker safety a priority during Safe Work month

Professions that require employees to travel offsite regularly or irregular hours can face added occupational safety risks that can be difficult for management to prepare for.

Every October, Safe Work Australia Month is held to raise awareness of the importance of workplace and occupational safety. From 2013 to 2014, there were 106,565 serious workers' compensation claims made* and tragically, 190 workers lost their lives while working in Australia in 2015.**

Workplace health and safety is of vital importance for all employees and employers, yet some professions face additional risks that can be difficult to prepare for. Fearless is a personal safety system that helps keep workers safe wherever they are. It is built for "lone workers" such as mobile staff, nurses, construction and salespeople.

Developed by Calamity, Fearless offers mobile protection to staff and helps businesses quickly comply with some of the toughest WHS requirements. It is accessible as a mobile app on smart phones. In a dangerous situation, or when staff fail to "check-in" as expected, an alarm can be raised through the app.

Calamity's 24/7 monitoring centre is alerted and has access to the user's location as well as using the phone for audio and camera evidence, allowing live operators to initiate a suitable response. The alarm can either be activated manually or automatically when a countdown timer reaches zero. The system is cloud-based so even if the phone is destroyed or stolen, the user can be protected.

Professions that require employees to travel offsite regularly or work irregular hours can face added occupational safety risks that can be difficult for management to prepare for. A survey of health professionals, teachers and police working in rural and remote Australia found that 57% had experienced verbal abuse from community members in the past 12 months and 21% had experienced physical violence.***

In situations that can compromise a person's feeling of safety, such as finishing a nursing shift late at night or needing to visit a stranger's house for an appointment, the app can offer peace of mind.

While travelling, Journey mode can be activated on the app, providing live updates to emergency contacts or employers if necessary. Meeting mode can be set for a potentially risky meeting or while alone. An alert is raised if a countdown timer reaches zero without being reset by the user. In situations where injury or personal immobilisation is a possibility, such as off-site construction, Man-Down is a function that offers additional protection by flagging any sudden deceleration, non-movement or impact.

The app has been purposefully built to assist in emergency situations and to dispatch help as quickly and efficiently as possible if needed. Businesses owners and managers feel at ease knowing that their staff are prepared for the worst case scenario or simple day to day risk.

"Fearless has far-reaching applications in so many workplace scenarios," says Mr Daniel Lewkovitz, CEO of Calamity and designer of the app.

"It has been carefully constructed to ensure employers can comply with Work Health and Safety requirements and offers peace of mind to anyone who may feel unsafe in their personal or professional life. Fearless takes a proactive approach to safety, as users can switch it on before any potentially dangerous situation, such as travelling to a meeting, and it will let others know you arrived safely without anyone needing to remember to text their boss. The technology is the best on the market and this tool saves lives," he said.

The Fearless app is available on iTunes and Google Play. RRP starts at $40 per month. For more information visit www.calamity.com.au/fearless-app/

* Safe Work Australia, Australian Workers' Compensation Statistics, 2013-2014

** Safe Work Australia, http://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/sites/swa/statistics/work-related-fatalities/pages/worker-fatalities

*** Working Safe, http://workingsafe.com.au/workplace-violence/

Originally published by Inside Small Business